For screen reader problems with this website, please call562-861-38195 6 2 8 6 1 3 8 1 9Standard carrier rates apply to texts.

Click here to schedule your appliance repair

Tips on What to Do When Your Allergies Start Acting Up in Bed

by Product Specialist IV

Tips on What to Do When Your Allergies Start Acting Up in Bed

Tips on What to Do When Your Allergies Start Acting Up in Bed

Many people suffer year-round from watery eyes, sinus pressure, and nasal congestion. Maybe you are new to the allergy-suffering world. Maybe you are looking for the best medicine for allergies and have yet to find relief. Whatever the reason, here are some tips to help you limit your exposure to the top offenders while trying to get a good night’s rest.

1. To prevent dust mites, cover the floor with washable throw rugs instead of carpets, which, like blankets, down comforters, and curtains, are favorite mite habitats. Wash rugs, bed linens, and curtains in hot water to kill mites. Dust often with a damp cloth.

2. If you’re allergic to dog and cat dander be sure to vacuum couches or chairs they've used. Or if you’re not a pet owner, but have friends with pets, still vacuum. Your friend clothes may carry their furry friends' dander, which can be deposited in your home and aggravate symptoms.

3. Indoor mold develops in moist areas. Get a dehumidifier to dry out your basement, and use exhaust fans in other areas prone to dampness and mold, such as the kitchen and bathroom. Wash bath mats often, and keep houseplants to a minimum.

4. Consider the fabrics on the clothes you purchase. Switch out synthetic materials for natural ones like cotton — your nose and eyes will thank you. When synthetic fabrics rub against one another, they create an electrical charge that attracts pollen, which is also electrically charged. Natural fibers such as cotton also breathe better, so they stay drier and are less hospitable to moisture-loving mold.

Tips on What to Do When Your Allergies Start Acting Up in Bed

5. Don’t forget to shower often to keep allergy invasions at bay. While you're outside, pollen and mold spores can parachute onto your hair, eyebrows, eyelashes, and skin. To give them the boot and minimize your exposure wash your hands, rinse your eyes, and shower before bed, or right away if you've done yard work. The same goes for your pet: Even if you're not allergic to your pup, he can become an allergy magnet after running around outdoors. Brush off his fur before you give him free reign of the house again.

6. OTC medications like antihistamines and decongestants can significantly relieve symptoms, but if your nose is still running, it may be time for an upgrade. Ask your doctor about a steroid nasal spray, which relieves these symptoms better than an antihistamine.

7. If pollen, ragweed, or dust mites are your main problem, think about getting allergy shots (immunotherapy). Injections of very small, safe amounts what you're allergic to will help your immune system become resistant to the allergens, so your body doesn't launch a full-out attack every time you inhale a pollen particle.

8. Lastly, before bed, enjoy a cup of green tea. Japanese researchers found that EGCG, the abundant antioxidant compound in green tea, may help stop your body from mounting an immune response to a wide range of allergens, including pollen, pet dander, and dust. Steeping two or three cups a day of green tea helps bolster the body's defenses.